What are the first steps in selecting a motor for my chruch?

  • What is the height of lift?
  • What is the maximum capacity the motor will be supporting?
  • If less than 1 ton, will the motor be mounted into a truss? If so we might be able to fit an SR1 into the truss to save headroom.
  • What kind of electrical power is available at the church? Three phase or single phase?
  • How will the motor(s) be controlled? Will the motors be controlled via a central controller or using a pickle?
  • Will the motors be stationary for an indefinite period of time? Will they be for temporary use? Will they be expected to work together? If so, how?
  • Will the motors be operating body up or body down?
  • Will a double brake be required on the motor?
  • Will the motor be required to fulfill any additional safety standards?
  • Will the customer require any additional accessories?
    • Additional cable?
    • Flight cases (to be supplied by others)
    • Controllers
    • Manual lifting products?

What are the first steps in selecting a motor for my entertainment event?

Same answers as above, including:

  • Will the motor be operating outdoors?

What are the Stagemaker motor’s configurations?

  • Configuration A features a three-phase direct motor control for easier setup and cabling. The hoist is equipped for mobile installations so it can be mounted in the body up or body down position. A direct motor control hoist in the body down position is best suited for temporary or short-term setups. 3-phase power, 3-phase direct control
  • Configuration B utilizes three-phase power and low voltage control. This motor is equipped for mobile installations so it can be mounted in the body up or body down positions. A pendant (pickle), which is used during stage setup, can be connected directly to the low voltage hoist control. 3-phase power, 115V control
  • Configuration S utilizes single-phase power and low voltage control. The hoist is equipped so it can be mounted in the body up or body down position. This hoist can be used in temporary or short-term set-ups or permanent installs when three-phase power sources are not available. 115V 1-phase power, 115V Control

What is the difference between normal and inverted position and in what application would I use them?

In the normal position, the hoist is mounted with load chain down and hoist body up. The load block attaches to the load and moves up and down. The hoist body is stationary.

 

In the inverted position, the hoist is mounted with load chain up and hoist body down. The hoist body attaches to the load and moves up and down with the load. This is often called a climbing motor.

 

Share This