Stagemaker Hoist

What are the first steps in selecting a motor for my church?

  • Determine the power supply.  What power is available (230 volt three-phase or 115 volt 1-phase)?
  • Determine the weight and arrangement of the rig.  What is the needed capacity of the motor(s), how many motors will be needed and where will they be hung?
  • Determine the motor orientation.  Will they be motor up or motor down?
  • Determine the height of lift needed and how the motors will be controlled.

What are the first steps in selecting a motor for my entertainment event?

  • Determine the power supply.  What power is available (230 volt 3-phase or 115 volt 1-phase)?
  • Determine the weight and arrangement of the rig.  What is the needed capacity of the motor(s), how many motors will be needed and where will they be hung?
  • Determine the motor orientation.  Will they be motor up or motor down?
  • Determine the height of lift needed and how the motors will be controlled.
  • Determine if a spare motor(s) is needed.

What are the different configurations for Stagemaker motors?

  • Configuration A features a three-phase direct motor control for easier setup and cabling. The hoist is equipped for mobile installations so it can be mounted in the body up or body down position. A direct motor control hoist in the body down position is best suited for temporary or short-term setups. Three-phase power, three-phase direct control
  • Configuration B utilizes three-phase power and low voltage control. This motor is equipped for mobile installations so it can be mounted in the body up or body down positions. A pendant (pickle), which is used during stage setup, can be connected directly to the low voltage hoist control. Three-phase power, 115V control
  • Configuration S utilizes single-phase power and low voltage control. The hoist is equipped so it can be mounted in the body up or body down position. This hoist can be used in temporary or short-term setups or permanent installs when three-phase power sources are not available. 115V 1-phase power, 115V Control

What is the difference between normal and inverted position and in what application would I use them?

  • Normal position is when the motor is mounted with the load chain down and the motor body up.  The load block is  attached to the load and moves up and down, while the motor body is stationary.  Normal position is best suited for permanent or fixed applications.  In this position, there is no cable management needed during lifting or lowering. 
  • Inverted position is when the motor is mounted with the load chain up and the motor body down.  The motor body is attached to the load and moves up and down with the load.  Inverted position is best suited for temporary applications.  In this position, it is much easier to install the motor because you hang the load block and not the motor.  The motor (the heaviest part) climbs the chain.  

 

Still have questions, or want to request a free quote? Contact us today!

 

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